Unit History

Unit History

In the summer of 1942, The Rotary Club of Oshawa and General Motors of Canada made a joint decision to support the formation of an Air Cadet Squadron in Oshawa. The Squadron received its charter on August 6th, 1942 and by October, five officers were training more than sixty cadets at the Oshawa Armory.

    • In 1943, Wing Commander Lloyd Vernun Chadburn inspected the new Squadron and allowed the Squadron to take his name. Chadburn is proudly displayed on the Squadron’s banner today.
    • The high standards and dedication of the officers and cadets have taken 151 Squadron to the highest proficiency award in Ontario a record six times. During the six-year period when only area awards were presented, the Squadron placed top in its area (Central – 50+ Squadrons). The Squadron has also placed second four times, top in Canada once, second in Canada once, and placement in the top ten of the more than 100 Ontario squadrons for 28 out of the last 31 years.
    • In 1950, the Squadron moved into its present headquarters, the Rotary Hall, originally a General Motors showroom until 1929. Renovated during the 1990-1991 training year by the City of Oshawa and Squadron staff, it now houses 160 plus cadets, officers and civilian staff in snug quarters.
    • The Squadron began a closer participation with other cadet units in the mid-1990’s, including Band exchanges, competitions and joint training exercises with nearby units including 85 Tornado Squadron (Grand Valley) and 351 Silver Star Squadron (Unionville).
    • The nine commanding officers since inception have taken 151 Squadron from purely military aims to the best example of youth organizations promoting citizenship, leadership, physical fitness and interest in aviation and the Canadian Armed Forces. Throughout all these years the Rotary Club of Oshawa has supported and sponsored this Squadron. Formed in 1983, the squadron’s music program features the Pipes and Drums and Military Bands of 151 Squadron. The squadron is one of the very few who offers both types of training. The band has distinguished itself in parades, inspections and numerous ceremonies for dignitaries both civilian and military.
  • The crest of 151 Squadron is designed in the approved format for all Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadrons: A winged roundel featuring the Squadron Name and Number, surmounted by the Canadian Coronet. The central theme of the Squadron crest features the stylized maple leaf used in the Canadian Air Force roundel, symbolizing the Squadron’s ties to the current Air Force. Superimposed over that is the Leaping Lynx, taken directly from the nose art on Wing Commander Chadburn’s own personal Spitfire, LV-C. This symbolizes the Squadron’s ties to the past. The unit crest was designed by Major Garry Burns in 1992, coinciding with the Squadron’s 50th Anniversary.

For over 4,700 cadets, 151 Chadburn Squadron has been a special experience and a second home for over 60 years.